Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (2024)

Engage NY Eureka Math 4th Grade Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key

Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Problem Set Answer Key

Question 1.
Record the factors of the given numbers as multiplication sentences and as a list in order from least to greatest. Classify each as prime (P) or composite (C). The first problem is done for you.
Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (1)
Answer:
Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (2)
Explanation:
A composite number is a natural number or a positive integer which has more than two factors. For example, 15 has factors 1, 3, 5 and 15, hence it is a composite number.
Prime numbersarenumbersthat have only 2 factors:
1 and themselves. For example, the first 5 prime numbers are 2, 3, 5, 7, and 11.
Recorded the factors of the given numbers as multiplication sentences and as a list in order from least to greatest.
Classified each as prime (P) or composite (C) as shown above.

Question 2.
Find all factors for the following numbers, and classify each number as prime or composite. Explain your classification of each as prime or composite.
Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (3)
Answer:
Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (4)
25 is composite,

Explanation:
Found all factors for the following number of 25 as
1 X 25 = 25, 5 X 5 = 25 and classified the number 25 as composite because 25 has more than 2 factors 1, 5, 25.

Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (5)
Answer:
Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (6)
28 is composite,

Explanation:
Found all factors for the following number of 28 as 1 X 28 = 28, 2 X 14 = 28, 4 X 7= 28 and classified the number 28 as composite because 28 has more than 2 factors 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, 28.

Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (7)
Answer:
Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (8)
29 is prime,

Explanation:
Found all factors for the following number of 29 as 1 X 29 = 29 and classified the number 29 as prime because 29 has only 2 factors just 1, 29.

Question 3.
Bryan says all prime numbers are odd numbers.
a. List all of the prime numbers less than 20 in numerical order.
Answer:
2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19,

Explanation:
Listed all the prime numbers less than 20 in numerical order are 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19.

b. Use your list to show that Bryan’s claim is false.
Answer:
Bryan’s claim is false because 2 is even number,

Explanation:
Bryan says all prime numbers are odd numbers but all the prime numbers less than 20 in order are 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19 from the list number 2 is even number so Bryan’s claim is false.

Question 4.
Sheila has 28 stickers to divide evenly among 3 friends. She thinks there will be no leftovers. Use what you know about factor pairs to explain if Sheila is correct.
Answer:
Sheila is incorrect, there will be 1 left over,

Explanation:
Given Sheila has 28 stickers to divide evenly among 3 friends.
She thinks there will be no leftovers but 3 is not a factor of 28, but 3 is a factor of 27, So each friend could receive 9 stickers each and there would be 1 sticker leftover.
3 X 9 = 27, 27 + 1 = 28.
So Sheila is incorrect, there will be 1 leftover.

Record the factors of the given numbers as multiplication sentences and as a list in order from least to greatest.
Classify each as prime (P) or composite (C).

Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (9)
Answer:
Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (10)

Explanation:
Recorded the factors of the given numbers as multiplication sentences and as a list in order from least to greatest.
Classified each as prime (P) or composite (C) as shown above.

Question 1.
Record the factors of the given numbers as multiplication sentences and as a list in order from least to greatest. Classify each as prime (P) or composite (C). The first problem is done for you.
Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (11)
Answer:
Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (12)

Explanation:
Recorded the factors of the given numbers as multiplication sentences and as a list in order from least to greatest.
Classified each as prime (P) or composite (C) as shown above.

Question 2.
Find all factors for the following numbers, and classify each number as prime or composite. Explain your classification of each as prime or composite.

Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (13)
Answer:
Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (14)
19 is prime,

Explanation:
Found all factors for the following number of 19 as 1 X 19 = 19 and classified the number 19 as prime because 19 has only 2 factors just 1, 19.

Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (15)
Answer:
Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (16)
21 is composite,

Explanation:
Found all factors for the following number of 28 as 1 X 21 = 21, 3 X 7 = 21 and classified the number 21 as composite because 21 has more than 2 factors 1, 3, 7, 21.

Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (17)
Answer:
Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (18)
24 is composite,

Explanation:
Found all factors for the following number of 24 as 1 X 24 = 24, 2 X 12 = 24, 3 X 8= 24, 4 X 6 = 24 and classified the number 24 as composite because 24 has more than 2 factors 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24.

Question 3.
Bryan says that only even numbers are composite.
a. List all of the odd numbers less than 20 in numerical order.
Answer:
2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19,

Explanation:
Listed all the odd numbers less than 20 in numerical order are 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 17, 19.

b. Use your list to show that Bryan’s claim is false.
Answer:
Bryan’s claim is false because only even numbers are composite even odd numbers are also composite because 9 is a odd number which is composite,

Explanation:
Bryan’s claim is false because only even numbers are composite even odd numbers are also composite because 9 is a odd number which is composite
1 X 9 = 9, 3 X 3 = 9, 9 has more than 2 factors, So Bryan’s claim is false.

Question 4.
Julie has 27 grapes to divide evenly among 3 friends. She thinks there will be no leftovers. Use what you know about factor pairs to explain whether or not Julie is correct.
Answer:
Julie is correct, there will be no leftovers,

Explanation:
Given Julie has 27 grapes to divide evenly among 3 friends. She thinks there will be no leftovers yes 3 is a factor of 27,
So each friend could receive 9 grapes each and there would be no grape left over,
3 X 9 = 27
So Julie is correct, there will be no leftovers.

Eureka Math Grade 4 Module 3 Lesson 22 Answer Key (2024)

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Eureka Math Print Materials

New Learn, Practice, Succeed student workbooks (Grades K–8) offer teachers multiple ways to differentiate instruction, provide extra practice, and assess student learning, and are available in Armenian, Arabic, French, Korean, Mandarin, and Spanish.

What are the four core components of a Eureka Math TEKS lesson? ›

Each lesson in A Story of Units is comprised of four critical components: fluency practice, concept development (including the problem set), application problem, and student debrief (including the Exit Ticket).

What is the hardest math grade? ›

Generally speaking, the most rigorous math courses in high school include Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus AB and BC, AP Statistics, and for some, Multivariable Calculus (which might be offered at your school or at a local college).

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Eureka Math Is Free

The curriculum is accompanied by a selection of instructional materials and support resources for teachers at no additional cost.

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Eureka Math is 1 hour for all grade levels (except in Kindergarten lessons are 50 minutes). We have always designed our elementary day with 1 hour dedicated to mathematics instruction.

Is Eureka Math aligned with Teks? ›

The K-5 Math COVID Emergency Release Pilot Edition V2 is currently called Eureka Math TEKS Edition and was built based on Texas standards. Students develop solid conceptual understanding, practice procedural skills and fluency, and apply what they learn in real-world scenarios.

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Eureka Math is a Common Core math. Eureka Math's framework is entirely built on the Common Core Learning Standards and Progressions for the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics.

What is the hardest math in 5th grade? ›

Some of the hardest math problems for fifth graders involve multiplying: multiplying using square models, multiplying fractions and whole numbers using expanded form, and multiplying fractions using number lines.

What math is 8th grade level? ›

Eighth-grade math is typically a course in pre-algebra to help prepare students for high school algebra.

What math level is 5th grade? ›

In fifth grade, students focus on adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing whole numbers, fractions, and decimals. Your kid will become fluent with computing these types of numbers and understanding the relationship between them. Students should also be able to use these numbers in real-world scenarios.

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With 1,500+ curriculum-aligned math skills for 1st to 8th grade, Prodigy Math is so much more than a game. Prodigy Math is an engaging game-based learning platform that's dedicated to improving students' confidence and achievements in math.

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